Easter Island Moai

Moai  [Listen] i/ˈmoʊ.aɪ/, or Mo‘ai, are monolithic human figures carved by the Rapa Nui people on Easter Island in eastern Polynesia between the years 1250 and 1500 CE.[1][2] Nearly half are still at Rano Raraku, the main moai quarry, but hundreds were transported from there and set on stone platforms called ahu around the island's perimeter. Almost all moai have overly large heads three-eighths the size of the whole statue. The moai are chiefly the living faces (aringa ora) of deified ancestors (aringa ora ata tepuna).[3] The statues still gazed inland across their clan lands when Europeans first visited the island, but all of them had fallen by the latter part of the 19th century.[4]

The production and transportation of the more than 900 statues[5][6] are considered remarkable creative and physical feats.[7] The tallest moai erected, called Paro, was almost 10 metres (33 ft) high and weighed 82 tons;[8]the heaviest erected was a shorter but squatter moai at Ahu Tongariki, weighing 86 tons; and one unfinished sculpture, if completed, would have been approximately 21 metres (69 ft) tall with a weight of about 270 tons.[citation needed] The moai toppled after European contact when islander traditions radically changed.[4]

for anyone who doubts it these puppies are very deeply buried (which takes a long time) just check out these pictures: